28 Comments
Apr 9Liked by Susanna Schrobsdorff

Thank you for reminding me to live life instead of analyzing it...

Expand full comment
author

Thanks for the kind words Vw.

Expand full comment
Apr 8Liked by Susanna Schrobsdorff

Always have the baguette…and the croissant, butter and cheese!

Expand full comment
author

Let's get that t-shirt, always have the baguette. I sort of remember this from living here for years in my 20s, but who'd believe it's still true at this age!

Expand full comment
Apr 8Liked by Susanna Schrobsdorff

I am off to buy the salted butter and the baguette. As always, dear friend, you find so much wisdom and joy in even the smallest of things, like duck fat. ❤️

Expand full comment
author

Aw, Lib, thank you for the kind words. Let's always make eating joyful. xx

Expand full comment
Apr 9Liked by Susanna Schrobsdorff

So true about American women’s eating ‘rules’……I grew up in the 70’s with ‘Twiggy’ as my role model….so I’m well versed!

Thanks for the reminder that food is life and why the F can’t we just enjoy it!!!

A fresh baguette a day….I’m in!

Expand full comment
author

Thanks for reading ,Jennifer. And I remember Twiggy, and for that matter every woman on TV....

Expand full comment
Apr 9Liked by Susanna Schrobsdorff

When I find a post by you in my inbox my first impulse is to be oh so jealous. You are living the life I have been planning for myself, but have not yet gotten to. But I find myself living vicariously through your wonderful writing and enjoying every moment with only a slight twinge of jealousy.

On the subject of this particular post:

As a younger woman, I had assumed that as my friends and I got older, we would grow out of our obsessions about food and weight. It seems that those of us "of a certain age" can't seem to shake the media indoctrination from our formative years in the 60's and 70's. Now that we are in our 60's and 70's, it's past time we learn from judgy French waiters. I spent two weeks in Paris a few years ago, had croissant for breakfast every day, followed by whatever I damn well felt like for the rest of the day (vacation calories don't count) and upon returning home found I had lost wait.

I hope you're enjoying your new life as much as I'm enjoying reading about it!

Expand full comment
author

Hi Jane,

I feel so ridiculously grateful for it all. And thank you for reading, and the kind words. And I love this line from your comment: "whatever I damn well felt like" so there! So good.

Expand full comment
Apr 9Liked by Susanna Schrobsdorff

I am glad the gentleman insisted. Imagine if he had not. You'd be none the wiser. Quite literally. Here's to embracing the joys of consuming real food.

Expand full comment
author

Me too! and yes, I'm pledging to lvoe food.

Expand full comment

I don't eat vegetables, and haven't since I was 16 (raised in a private British boarding school in a war, and the Brits can't cook veggies even in good times). My daughter is a vegetarian. Traveling in France together on four separate occasions, we discovered that our food demands were way beyond the comprehension and imagination of EVERY French waiter we ever met..

Expand full comment
author

Hi Richard! So funny. One of my kids was vegan for a while and we learned to love dahl. But now we are kind of moderates, a little meat, not every day.

Expand full comment
Apr 9Liked by Susanna Schrobsdorff

A delightful account of your foodie life in Paris so far

Expand full comment
author

Thanks so much Rosie, for reading and for saying so.

Expand full comment
Apr 8Liked by Susanna Schrobsdorff

I've had this same experience in countries where the bread is fresh and expected to be eaten within hours of leaving the oven! It's a real thing! Also, maybe no coincidence that when we want to say "joie de vivre" we pathetic anglophones are forced to use the french term...

Expand full comment
author
Apr 9·edited Apr 9Author

Hi Haley! hahaha. We also use the french word for double entendres too.

Expand full comment
Apr 8Liked by Susanna Schrobsdorff

Waiters in U.S. don't ask if you are finished and they certainly don't ask if you enjoyed the plate filled with food that they are removing from in front of you. They just present you with a bill! You're finally living in a civilized food society. You go, girl, eat it all and as often as you wish!

Expand full comment
author

Hi Judith, haha, yes, it feels that way,...

Expand full comment
Apr 8Liked by Susanna Schrobsdorff

We Americans are so neurotic about food. So nice to be in a place where you can just enjoy it. Whenever I have been in France, I ate whatever I wanted, didn’t think about it, and lost weight. Wish that would happen here.

Your dog is over the top adorable, BTW

Expand full comment
author

So true! And doggie thanks you for the kind words. :)

Expand full comment

Waiters can take some managing. Once in Angelina's inside the château de Versailles I ordered both the truffle soup AND the truffle ravioli. The waiter looked disapproving. When I asked for his wine recommendation, he seemed mollified.

Expand full comment
author

I can't yet challenge them, I just nod and say bring me the veal kidneys, ha.

Expand full comment
founding
Apr 8Liked by Susanna Schrobsdorff

I hope your gall bladder is intact. Faced with that duck fat, I'd take Mr Waiter's insouciance over tomorrow's GI upset. But I'm glad you enjoyed it.

While I'm here I'll mention that the only thing you deserve is what you've earned through your own behavior. Think about that in relation to self-esteem.

Bon manger!

Expand full comment

An elderly lady once said to me about eating food: "If you like it, it is undoubtedly bad for you!" That pretty well summarizes what you said about the pleasure of eating something you enjoy and feeling guilty about it and having to "atone" for it! That is the part of our puritanic background which southern Europeans don't have!. I was fortunate enough to live for several years in Italy where enjoyment not just of food but of life in general is not a sin! Moderation is probably a good idea but guilt over eating good food is too bad!

Expand full comment
author

Thanks so much Wissie! You're so right. The southern Europeans know what's what, and they live longer too.

Expand full comment
author

Hi Dave, All went well gastrically. :) Turns out duck fat is full of unsaturated fats, antioxidents and antiinflammatory properties... mainly oleic acid and linoleic acid. And my niece who can't eat bread in the U.S. ate baguettes all week and had no upset--something about the additives in the U.S. So come on over!

Expand full comment